Review of Zack Bagans’ Halloween Special

 

I have some guilty pleasures that I hate to admit, and watching travel shows has been one of them. Hence my interest in the Travel Channel. As I recall, the Travel Channel used to be a place for travel shows. That seems to have changed over the years. Travel Channel morphed into the Poker Channel, and it rode on the interest in televised poker matches. Now it seems heavy on “paranormal investigations” with some very light travel thrown in as the investigators visit numerous sights reputed to be haunted. One show that seems to have lasted for a very long time is “Ghost Adventures” led by Zack Bagans and a host of other paranormal investigators accompanied by  a plethora of electronic gadgets.

On Halloween,  after all of the trick-or-treaters had completed their rounds, I parked on the sofa to channel surf, and settled in on Zack Bagans’ Halloween Special filmed in Zack’s own museum in Las Vegas. Who knows, I may place a paranormal investigator in one of my hoped-for novels, so I wanted to tune into this apparent cultural phenomenon. It was supposedly a live ghost hunting episode in the “Haunted Museum” in Las Vegas where Zack has accumulated a number of objects and exhibits that have been the source of huge paranormal activity as a result of some past incident or violence surrounding the object. Because of the supposed dangers involved in this investigation, Zack had assembled emergency paramedics, a few witches he was acquainted with through his travels, a rabbi, some other paranormal investigators he knew. If things really got tough, he had an exorcist on hand. I hadn’t heard of Zack’s museum, but the internet told me he was asking $44 a head to tour his museum. Reviews were generally very positive despite the steep price. It seems most of the guides had some sort of paranormal experience during their work at Zack’s museum. There were a few skeptics expressing themselves in the reviews I read, but most reviews were glowingly positive.  We tuned in.

Zack and his team arrived at the museum with a police escort. The crowd of onlookers cheered wildly. The high point of the show was to be the opening of something called the Dybbuk Box that was promoted as  the most possessed object on the planet. It had something to do with the Holocaust  Hence the presence of the rabbi. There was also a witch in the basement doing various incantations all night. A second witch entered the cellar later in the show. One witch was dressed in black and the other witch was dressed in white. It looked like a conflict between witches was brewing. Peggy, the creepy haunted doll was taken out of her case. A haunted mirror was uncovered. A Ouija board was used by some investigators. Electronic contraptions were spinning and sparking. Incantations were heard from the witches in the basement. Much going on here. The principals of the show said they felt chills and sometimes acted strangely. The investigators often claimed they heard strange noises. The Dybbuk Box was touched and never opened. Zack decided it was just too dangerous. The rabbi was not very concerned with anything and seemed to disappear from view. Nothing happened with the witches. Peggy the creepy doll did not do anything. Paramedics remained outside the museum.

In my own humble opinion, absolutely nothing happened during this show, but Zack and his investigators claimed they got real good evidence for future analysis. I can’t say I enjoyed the show, but I did watch it in its entirety, and felt pretty stupid when I finally went to bed. I didn’t get it, but I got a lot of laughs out of it. I can’t argue with someone who has had a successful show for so long, and operates a museum that costs $44 a person to get in. It is not my cup of tea, but Zack must be doing something right. I may even watch another episode of Ghost Adventures, if the spirit moves me. Saying I didn’t like the show might attract negative entities or put a curse on me, and I don’t have the phone number of my local exorcist.

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